Heads up, class of 2020 — you’re about to face a job market unlike any other. The same holds true for experienced professionals. And while watching Netflix until the situation improves is certainly one option, self-made billionaire and “Shark Tank” judge Mark Cuban says there’s a better choice.

“Now is when you have time to think about what America 2.0 will look like and have time to experiment trying something new,” he says.

Think beyond your resume and college major, says Christine Cruzvergara, vice president of higher education and student success at Handshake, the largest early talent recruiting platform connecting employers, candidates and colleges. “Your next job may not be your dream job,” she says, but it could be perfect for your future. She also advises job seekers to be flexible.

Cuban agrees, noting that we don’t yet know what the post-COVID-19 world will look like. “But it won’t be the same,” he says.
We’ve checked with experts from Atrium Staffing, Handshake, Indeed.com, LinkedIn and employers to learn who’s hiring right now in the tri-state area.

Retail 2.0

Desire for delivery to the doorstep contact-free has created more than a million new jobs. According to LinkedIn editor Andrew Seaman, Instacart is looking to hire 300,000 contract workers over the next three months, Amazon needs 175,000 for its fulfillment centers and delivery network, and CVS and Walmart need 50,000 hired hands across their businesses.

It’s worth noting that people of all educational and professional levels are now working these jobs. Marc Aschoff, CEO at alkaline water deliverer Tribeca Beverage employs workers from all walks of life, including a soon-to-be Accenture associate whose start date has been delayed.

Pay ranges from just above minimum wage to more than $100,000 for those who work their way into upper management.

Financial services

Investment, lending and customer services professionals are in demand, especially in roles that leverage technology to deliver more optimal solutions for their customers. Employers such as Chase, Fidelity Investments and Morgan Stanley are now hiring.

Mortgage maker Better.com, in the Financial District, says they will hire and train up to 1,000 displaced hospitality workers in 2020. Business at Midtown-based Piermont Bank, which has only been open for under a year, is booming. Not only will they be launching an internship program soon, but they’re also hiring experienced professionals. Hint: Brush up on your tech skills and prepare for a virtual interview. Send a thank-you note that includes specifics from the interview. CEO Wendy Cai-Lee is turned off by lazy cut-and-paste letters.

Pay starts around $45,000, but the sky’s the limit with bonuses and commission.

Health care and human services

There’s a perpetual shortage in these professions with an especially large call for certified nursing assistants, radiology technologists and social workers.

Now, COVID-19 testers and tracers can be added to the list. While it doesn’t specifically require experience in the health-care industry, you do need to have strong communication skills and access to a computer. The pay ranges from volunteer status to $22 per hour. Contrace.org is one of the places to apply.

Nonprofit Community Access is actively hiring in Brooklyn, The Bronx and Manhattan. While they welcome applicants from all walks of life and career stages, the “must-haves” for the job are compassion and a desire to make a difference, says CEO Cal Hedigan.

Positions range from housing counselors and respite workers to bilingual coordinators, harms reduction specialists (reducing substance abuse), receptionists and more. Most offer competitive salaries, from $30,000 to $85,000, with comprehensive benefits, flexible hours and above-average paid time off.

Software and technology

Adam Samples, president of Atrium Staffing, says that there are jobs in many sectors of the economy, including information technology, which are “essential services in many ways,” since they power everything from health-care and financial services to banking and the city’s tech firms and startups. He reckons that “there’s a good amount of pent-up demand,” which he expects to produce jobs when the pandemic tapers down. Still, he doesn’t recommend that new grads or underemployed individuals wait until then before applying. “Get your foot in the door now,” he says.

Software maker MongoDB in Midtown hasn’t slowed hiring at all. “Even in these challenging times, organizations are looking to modernize their technology infrastructure. In some cases, this need is now more acute than ever. So, we are continuing to hire great talent,” says Michael Gordon, COO and CFO, MongoDB. They have nearly 100 positions available, including some for interns.

Pay varies widely, but is generally $60,000 to $130,000 and up.

Senior living

If you want to work in an industry where the mailroom attendant can become a big shot, try working in senior housing and assisted living developments, says Shane Herlet, COO at Maplewood Senior Living which has locations in the city as well as New Jersey and Connecticut.

Top jobs include on-site managers for an entire community and project managers who oversee the planning and construction of new development.

The industry has more than 600 jobs open in Manhattan alone, ranging from food preparation and chauffeur services to maintenance and health care, as well as recreation coordinators.

“The largest requirement is the desire to make a profound interest in people’s lives,” says Herlet.

Pay ranges from minimum wage to $100,000, and can go higher.

Source: nypost.com/feed